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Facebook not to store data in countries with recorded violations of human rights

In a long manifesto about Facebook’s future, CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company is willing to be banned in countries that object to its new focus on privacy, specifically the emphasis on secure data storage.

Facebook not to store data in countries with recorded violations of human rights

Facebook not to store data in countries with recorded violations of human rights
STEPANAKERT,  MARCH 7, ARTSAKHPRESS: That might sink any chance of Facebook operating in China, a huge market it’s been flirting with entering for years. But it also might let Facebook claim some moral high ground over one of its competitors: Apple, The Verge reports.
Zuckerberg described a vision for Facebook that’s based on secure, encrypted, and ephemeral messaging — and one part of that vision is data storage. “I believe one of the most important decisions we’ll make is where we’ll build data centers and store people’s sensitive data,” he wrote. But he acknowledged that this might mean staying out of certain countries.

There’s an important difference between providing a service in a country and storing people’s data there. As we build our infrastructure around the world, we’ve chosen not to build data centers in countries that have a track record of violating human rights like privacy or freedom of expression. If we build data centers and store sensitive data in these countries, rather than just caching non-sensitive data, it could make it easier for those governments to take people’s information.

Upholding this principle may mean that our services will get blocked in some countries, or that we won’t be able to enter others anytime soon. That’s a tradeoff we’re willing to make. We do not believe storing people’s data in some countries is a secure enough foundation to build such important internet infrastructure on.


     

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